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November 6, 2006

Making Law Courses Available on Web

Berkeley's Pam Samuelson and Mitch Kapor have made the audio and video of their seminar on open source available on the Internet. 

So here is an opportunity to "take" a Berkeley Law School and Information school course...

Have others made their courses publicly available in this way?  Will other law schools do so in the future?

Anupam Chander

November 6, 2006 in Teaching -- curriculum | Permalink

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Take a look at CALI Classcaster (http://www.classcaster.org/) where over 60 law professors from schools across the country are podcasting course lectures and lecture summaries. This archive currently holds over 2000 hours of material on a range of subjects and is growing at a rate of about 10 hours a day right now.

Posted by: Elmer Masters | Nov 6, 2006 7:48:29 PM

Take a look at CALI Classcaster (http://www.classcaster.org/ ) where over 60 law professors are podcasting course lectures and lecture summaries. This archive currently holds over 2000 hours of material on a range of subjects and is growing at a rate of about 10 hours a day right now.

Posted by: Elmer Masters | Nov 6, 2006 7:52:04 PM

Prof. Charlie Nesson's upper-level "CyberOne: Law in the Court of Public Opinion" is video/podcasting class lectures (http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/cyberone/course-materials/lecture-videos/) and is generally encouraging wide participation through a simultaneous Extension School (continuing ed) course that his daughter, Rebecca, is running and that I'm helping to facilitate. The course actively encourages everyone interested to get involved through a variety of media and especially through a capstone project. (In all the hoopla about the class's use of Second Life, its highly open nature is often overlooked).

The State of Play Academy (http://www.stateofplayacademy.com), based at New York Law School / Stanford, also has as its mission the wide dissemination of legal education, though its lectures are delivered live through a 3D platform (there.com) rather than recorded and redistributed.

Posted by: Gene Koo | Nov 7, 2006 2:14:28 PM

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